Skip to main content

Mile High Natural Awakenings

Runoff Results: Gulf Dead Zone Keeps Growing

Elena11/Shutterstock.com

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimates the algae-choked “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico near the mouth of the Mississippi River spanned 7,829 square miles this summer, roughly the size of Massachusetts and considerably above the 6,000-square-mile five-year average. The largest recorded Gulf dead zone to date was 8,776 square miles in 2017. Dead zones occur when algae sinks and decomposes, sucking oxygen from the water and making it impossible for marine life to exist, jeopardizing billions of dollars generated by commercial fishing in the area. The phenomenon is primarily attributed to chemical fertilizer runoff from Midwestern farms into the Mississippi, exacerbated by warming trends.

Upcoming Events Near You
COMING IN PRINT: JULY FOOD CONNECTION ISSUE
Due date: Wed June 10. Call 303-770-1981 or email us for more info [email protected] 

 

We Need Your Support too! Any amount helps us keep the magazine free
eBlasts and eMail newsletters get your message out instantly!

Email News Exclusives with Social Media pushes $50; ask us about it today! Group Emails bimonthly: $25. 303-770-1981 or [email protected]


Ways to Calm Anxiety During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Receive the Good News Email Newsletter and/or Free Digital Magazine Subscription
Sign Up Now
Balance Water Consumption for Cognitive Health