Skip to main content

Mile High Natural Awakenings

Generating Electricity from Rain

Rainfall Generate Electricity

ifong/Shutterstock.com

A surprisingly high voltage can be generated from raindrops using a field-effect, transistor-style structure, reports a new study from the City University of Hong Kong in the journal Nature. A single drop can muster 140 volts, enough to briefly light up 100 small LED bulbs. The new design couples an aluminum electrode with an indium-tin oxide electrode layered with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a material with a quasi-permanent electric charge. When a raindrop hits the PTFE/tin surface, it bridges the two electrodes and creates a closed-loop circuit that helps fully release any stored charges. The technology could handle sustained rainfall, as well. If there are continuous drops, the charge accumulates and eventually hits a saturation point. Building rooftops could supplement some of the electricity used inside, and electric boats could extend their range.
Upcoming Events Near You
COMING IN PRINT: JULY FOOD CONNECTION ISSUE
Due date: Wed June 10. Call 303-770-1981 or email us for more info [email protected] 

 

We Need Your Support too! Any amount helps us keep the magazine free
eBlasts and eMail newsletters get your message out instantly!

Email News Exclusives with Social Media pushes $50; ask us about it today! Group Emails bimonthly: $25. 303-770-1981 or [email protected]


Ways to Calm Anxiety During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Receive the Good News Email Newsletter and/or Free Digital Magazine Subscription
Sign Up Now
Balance Water Consumption for Cognitive Health